1st Annual California Lawyers Association Meeting – September 14-15, 2018 in San Diego!

OK – get out your playbooks:  Last year, The Sections were still part of the State Bar of California, but our annual meeting was separate from the Bar and was called the “1st Annual Calbar Section Convention“.  On January 1st, 2018, the Sections were spun off into our own entity, the California Lawyers Association (CLA) – and with a new entity comes a new event name:  The “California Lawyers Association Annual Meeting”.  Got all that?

So, I’m dropping by to tell you that I’ll be presenting a one-hour program in San Diego at 4:20 pm on Saturday, September 15th with my colleague from the California Young Lawyers Association, Michael Iseri:

Legal Cyber Security: Best Standards & Practices for Law Firms

Keep an eye on the CLA’s page for the event for further details.

LPMT 2018 Law + Technology Summit – Jan. 26-27

Mark your calendars.  As one of the first out of the gate for the new California Lawyers Association, the Law Practice Management and Technology Section, in partnership with the San Diego County Bar Association, presents the inaugural 2018 Law + Technology Summit, in (where else?) San Diego.

Yours truly will be doing a program on Ethical Considerations for your Online Presence.  Click here for more details!

The State Bar of California Sections is Now the California Lawyers Association

Happy New Year!

So, why am I never writing blog posts anymore?  Because for the last two-plus years, I’ve been working to complete the transition of the The Sections from the State Bar of California into a private entity – the last four months as Chair.

As of January 1, 2018, the California Lawyers Association became our official home.  Visit us at our new site, cla.legal.

1st Annual Calbar Section Convention – August 18-19, 2017 in San Diego!

2017-08-18_section-convention

You may have noticed that I don’t post much anymore.  However, I’d like to mention that yours truly will be presenting a program at the convention:

Date: Friday, August 18, 2017
Program Time: 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
Program Number: 9
Program Title: Using Technology in Trial to be Persuasive and Stay Organized
Speakers:
Jeffrey Bennion and Perry Segal

Now, in the spirit of continuing my new tradition, I’m posting the information and links verbatim.

Section Convention

The Sections of The State Bar of California are pleased to announce plans for the inaugural Section Convention on August 18 and 19, 2017 in San Diego.

August 18-19, 2017
Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Spa
1380 Harbor Island Drive
San Diego, CA 92101

Earn 12 Hours of Participatory MCLE Credit, Including Legal Ethics and Competence Issues

Thirty-six  education programs, all approved for MCLE credit.

Hundreds of California lawyers, judicial officers and legal staff in attendance.

Much more is planned, so save the date.  Details will be published at Section Convention soon!

EDISCOVERY CALIFORNIA: FORMAL OPINION NO. 2016-196 – ATTORNEY BLOGGING

Disclaimer:  This is a State Bar of California Opinion, and I’m Vice-Chair of the Council of California State Bar Sections (CSBS).  I want to remind you, “This blog site is published by and reflects the personal views of Perry L. Segal, in his individual capacity.  Any views expressed herein have not been adopted by the State Bar of California’s Board of Trustees or overall membership, nor are they to be construed as representing the position of the State Bar of California.”

To put it simply, the premise of CAL 2016-196 is to address when:  1) A blog post becomes a “communication”, as defined under the RPC and the State Bar Act, and 2) If it is deemed a communication, is it “attorney advertising”?

First of all, what constitutes a blog (or, as I prefer to call legal blogs, a “blawg”)?  Hmmm.  Well, if you call it a blawg, that’s probably a big hint that it’ll be legal in nature, but that’s not really what I’m getting at here.  Are your scribbles on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram “blogging”, for the purposes of this opinion?

You bet (if those scribbles are legal in nature and/or purport to advertise your services).  You may not be aware of it, but products like Twitter are referred to as “micro-blogs”.

I think the continuing problem with a lot of these opinions is that they cause people to lose their minds worrying about them as if they’re something new.  The reality is, technically, a blog post is no different than if it were an article in a magazine that had a little blurb at the end that includes your contact information.  You’ll be subject to regulation for attorney advertising (California’s Rule of Professional Conduct, rule 1-400 – Advertising & Solicitation).

The real differences?

  • Someone has to subscribe to the magazine, receive it for free or pick it up in the dentist’s office office or a friend’s home.  However, if your blog is public, you need to understand, that means public; available to anyone, anywhere in the world at any time who has access to the internet.
  • The jurisdiction in which someone reads it may not authorize attorney blogging.

I bet many of you see where I’m going with the second point.  Could this trigger an accusation of improper advertising?  What about an in-depth article including opinion on a particular law?  Could that be unauthorized practice of law?

Yes and yes.  So what do you do?  For starters, click on the link above and read the opinion.  It’s only eight pages, and you’ll quickly see that a lot of it triggers opinions you’ve seen before, such as CAL 2012-186.  Two, disclaim, Disclaim, DISCLAIM.  Many a problem is eliminated if you simply inform your readers of your audience.

Of course, you can’t do that on Twitter.  So you might link to your disclaimer, or state briefly, “All opinions are my own.”

Oh, and there’s this last bugaboo:  You must be able to reproduce each and every post you’ve made for the past two years (while you’re gasping, keep in mind, it’s three years in New York).

Re-Elected to a Second, Three-Year Term on the Council of State Bar Sections

csbs-tombstoneOn the heels of being awarded a tombstone for completing my three-year term on the Council, I was re-elected to a second term.

This is unprecedented (probably because prior officers had the good sense not to run again!).  My co-officer, Mark Ressa, was also re-elected.  The unanimous view from our colleagues: Gluttons for punishment.

With no fee bill or resolution to the issue of de-unification/separation, these are extremely challenging times for the Sections.  It’s anybody’s guess how we’ll be structured a year from now.

Tombstone, indeed.

CALBAR 89TH ANNUAL MEETING: SEPTEMBER 29 – OCTOBER 2, 2016 – SAN DIEGO

Calbar 89th Annl Mtg

Another conference, another post!

We’re over ten weeks out from the State Bar of California’s 89th Annual Meeting in San Diego.  Bookmark this link to stay up-to-date about hotels, registration, events and programs.

I know what you’re thinking:  Where’s my usual sneak peek at the latest info?  Well, here’s info on my program, presented with my LPMT colleague, Jeff Bennion:

Everything Attorneys Ever Wanted to Know About the Cloud (but were afraid to ask!)

Program 38:  Sept. 30 | 10:30 a.m. – 12 noon

This advanced program covers all aspects of what attorneys need to know before they place their trust and information—and that of their clients—on the cloud.  Learn about the perks and pitfalls of making use of this now-ubiquitous tool, including what State Bar ethics rules have to say.

Download LPMT’s free app for Apple and Android devices.  All of the programs will be listed on the calendar.

Doing the Splits!

Split Moon BWWow…I haven’t posted in two months.  Why not?  Well, the bulk of my *spare* time has been occupied with something called “Deunification“.  This isn’t actually a word, by the way (as your spellchecker will probably tell you), it’s what the State Bar of California – and the legislature – have adopted to describe the prospect of splitting the Bar in two; Regulatory on one side and Voluntary on the other.  If you want, you can refer to it by its official name, “Governance in the Public Interest Task Force“.

Every time I hear the word “Deunification”, I think of the Moonies.

Needless to say, this is by no means a simple process, and the educational Sections are caught in the middle of it.  The debate – as you can probably figure out – is over which side the Sections should occupy.

To put this in the form of an essay question on the Bar exam, it would be followed by this simple word:

“Discuss!” [‘bang’ added]

And we have been.  And we are.  And we will be, into the foreseeable future…

Last, But Not Least (I Say!)

Well, I received the results of the Board election on March 10th,  literally as I was leaving town, so I didn’t get a chance to report back.  In a field of five candidates, I came in last!

So, in the short term, it’s back to work!  I’ll have to consider whether to run again in three years, but for now, there’s plenty to do.

Thanks to all who voted for me.

An IT Executive Turned California eDiscovery & Litigation Attorney and Consultant Shares his Personal Insights.